A Beginner's Guide to the Low-FODMAP Diet

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What is the Low-FODMAP Diet?

With the growing number of people that experience chronic digestive issues, the low FODMAP Diet has generated quite a bit of attention lately. This eating plan was originally developed to help manage the symptoms associated with irritable bowel syndrome. Now we know that MOST people that have IBS actually have a medical condition called SIBO which stands for Small intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

FODMAP is an acronym for:

Fermentable
Oligosaccharides
Disaccharides
Monosaccharides
and
Polyols

These are short-chain carbohydrates that are found in many of the foods we eat.  FODMAPs are poorly absorbed in the intestine,they draw extra water into the intestine and are rapidly fermented by bacteria in the bowel. Depending on the quantity consumed and an individual's tolerance, FODMAPs can lead to digestive issues such as flatulence, bloating, abdominal pain, constipation and diarrhea.

Almost all of the individuals that have been diagnosed with SIBO or IBS experience immediate relief from symptoms from following the low FODMAP diet plan. My clients also report clearer skin, much higher energy, weight loss, elevated mood and decreased anxiety.

Who is the Low-FODMAP Diet for?

The low FODMAP diet is for anyone experiencing frequent digestive issues such as bloating, stomach pain or cramping, gas, diarrhea or constipation. Most of these individuals with find relief once they begin eliminating FODMAPS

How to to Start the Low-FODMAP Diet

It’s recommended to work with a registered dietitian when starting the low FODMAP diet. A registered dietitian, especially one that specializes in digestive health, can simplify things for you so that it’s not difficult to follow. I evaluate my patients current intake and help that make modifications to eliminate FODMAPS. I provide them with many meal and snack ideas to choose from, and outline a FODMAP meal plan that is tailored for each individual. I also give my clients access to my new app that allows them to quickly and easily determine if a food product is low FODMAP or not

3 things you should know before starting the Low-FODMAP Diet

The 3 most important things you should know before starting a Low FODMAP diet are;

  1. This is not forever. It’s recommended to follow it strictly before reintroducing FODMAP groups with your dietitian to determine which groups you are intolerant to and which you are not.

  2. Portion size is very important. If you are too eat too much of a low FODMAP fruit, vegetable, or starch then it will become high fodmap

  3. You don’t have to give up your favorite foods. Your dietitian can help you find substitutes for nearly every food you enjoy.

Below is a list of High FODMAPS foods to minimize or avoid for 2-6 weeks until your symptoms improve or disappear. I’ve also included a list of low FODMAP foods to include in your diet. It may seem confusing, restrictive and overwhelming at first. With the help of a dietitian and a low FODMAP meal plan it should become easy. Once you start feeling better you will never want to go back to eating high FODMAPS. It just needs a little time and patience, and guidance from a registered dietitian.

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Vegetables:
Broccoli stocks
Garlic
Onions
Asparagus
Beans/ legumes (black, broad, kidney, lima, soy)
Cauliflower
Mushrooms
Peas
Scallion/ spring onions (white part)
Dairy:
Cow’s Milk
Goats Milk
Sheep Milk
Buttermilk
Soft cheese
Custard
Yogurt


Grains
Rye
Wheat
Spelt

High FODMAP Foods To AVOID:

Fruit
Apples
Apricot
Avocado (1/4 suitable)
Bananas, ripe
Blackberries
Grapefruit
Mango
Peaches
Pears
Plums
Raisins
Sultanas
Watermelon
Concentrated fruit juice
Dried fruit
Fruit Juice (limit ¼ cup)


Nuts & Seeds
Cashews
Pistachio

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Low FODMAP list for you to enjoy…. but still always practice moderation!

Vegetables:

Arugula

Bamboo

Sprouts

Bell pepper

Bok Choy

Carrots

Chives

Cucumber

Endive

Ginger

Green beans

Mixed greens

Kale

Olives

Parsnip

Potato

Radish

Red Chili

Silver beet

Spinach

Spring onion (green only)

Squash

Tomato

Turnip

Water chestnuts

Yam

Zucchini


Sweeteners:

Glucose

Maple Syrup

Sucrose

Sugar


Protein

Fish and shellfish

Chicken

Turkey

Eggs

Pork

Tofu

Seitan

Red meats

Alcohol:

Gin

Vodka

Whiskey

Tequila



Fruits:

Unripe banana

Blueberries

Cantaloupe

Clementine

Grapes

Honeydew

Kiwi

Lemon

Lime

Mandarin

Orange

Passion Fruit

Paw Paw

Pineapple

Raspberry

Rhubarb

Star Anise

Strawberries

Tangelos

Dairy:

Lactose Free Milk

Lactose Free Yogurt

Hard Cheeses

Grains:

Arrowroot

Oats

Millet

Polenta

Psyllium

Quinoa

Rice

Sorgum

Tapioca

Nuts/ Seeds (max ¼ cup):

Chia Seed

Flax seed

Hazelnuts

Macadamia nuts

Peanuts

Pecans

Pine nuts

Pumpkin Seed

Sesame Seed

Sunflower Seeds

Walnuts




Natalie Lui